Author: Francis J. Bremer, Genre: Biography & Autobiography, Total Page: 426, Publisher: University of Virginia Press, ISBN: UVA:X004995391

When John Winthrop, first governor of the Massachusetts Bay Colony, emigrated from Stuart England to America, he and the colonists who accompanied him carried much of their culture with them. Written by leading English and American scholars, the essays in The World of John Winthrop: England and New England, 1588-1649 vigorously assert a new unity to the transatlantic and Puritan, Anglo-American sphere, integrating the English and colonial stories from a refreshingly single perspective. Contributors: Tom Webster (University of Edinburgh) * Mark A. Peterson (University of Iowa) * David D. Hall (Harvard Divinity School) * Alexandra Walsham (University of Exeter) * Alden Vaughan (Columbia University) * Virginia Mason Vaughan (Clark University) * Richard J. Ross (University of Illinois) * James S. Hart (University of Oklahoma) * Richard Godbeer (University of Miami) * Mark Valeri (Union Theological Seminary of Virginia) * Lyn Botelho (Indiana University of Pennsylvania) * Francis J. Bremer (Millersville University of Pennsylvania)

Author: James G. Moseley, Genre: Biography & Autobiography, Total Page: 206, Publisher: Univ of Wisconsin Press, ISBN: 0299135349

One of the most famous American journals is that of 17th century Puritan leader John Winthrop. As the first governor of the Massachusetts Bay Colony, an office he held with few interruptions for two decades, he worked to establish a society in which he thought true Christianity could flourish, beyond the reach of the unfaithful Church of England. Winthrop's journal has provided a window into a world that, while unfamiliar, continues to influence our sense of the meaning of America.

Author: John Winthrop, Genre: Biography & Autobiography, Total Page: 862, Publisher: Harvard University Press, ISBN: 0674034384

For 350 years Governor John Winthrop's journal has been recognized as the central source for the history of Massachusetts in the 1630s and 1640s. Winthrop reported events--especially religious and political events--more fully and more candidly than any other contemporary observer. The governor's journal has been edited and published three times since 1790, but these editions are long outmoded. Richard Dunn and Laetitia Yeandle have now prepared a long-awaited scholarly edition, complete with introduction, notes, and appendices. This full-scale, unabridged edition uses the manuscript volumes of the first and third notebooks (both carefully preserved at the Massachusetts Historical Society), retaining their spelling and punctuation, and James Savage's transcription of the middle notebook (accidentally destroyed in 1825). Winthrop's narrative began as a journal and evolved into a history. As a dedicated Puritan convert, Winthrop decided to emigrate to America in 1630 with members of the Massachusetts Bay Company, who had chosen him as their governor. Just before sailing, he began a day-to-day account of his voyage. He continued his journal when he reached Massachusetts, at first making brief and irregular entries, followed by more frequent writing sessions and contemporaneous reporting, and finally, from 1643 onward, engaging in only irregular writing sessions and retrospective reporting. Naturally he found little good to say about such outright adversaries as Thomas Morton, Roger Williams, and Anne Hutchinson. Yet he was also adept at thrusting barbs at most of the other prominent players: John Endecott, Henry Vane, and Richard Saltonstall, among others. Winthrop built lasting significance into the seemingly small-scale actions of a few thousand colonists in early New England, which is why his journal will remain an important historical source.

Author: James G. Moseley, Genre: Biography & Autobiography, Total Page: 216, Publisher: , ISBN: UVA:X002190874

One of the most famous American journals is that of 17th century Puritan leader John Winthrop. As the first governor of the Massachusetts Bay Colony, an office he held with few interruptions for two decades, he worked to establish a society in which he thought true Christianity could flourish, beyond the reach of the unfaithful Church of England. Winthrop's journal has provided a window into a world that, while unfamiliar, continues to influence our sense of the meaning of America.

Author: Gale, Cengage Learning, Genre: Literary Criticism, Total Page: 14, Publisher: Gale, Cengage Learning , ISBN: 9781410352866

A Study Guide for John Winthrop's "A Model of Christian Charity," excerpted from Gale's acclaimed Literary Themes for Students: The American Dream. This concise study guide includes plot summary; character analysis; author biography; study questions; historical context; suggestions for further reading; and much more. For any literature project, trust Literary Themes for Students: The American Dream for all of your research needs.

Author: Michael Parker, Genre: History, Total Page: 203, Publisher: Routledge, ISBN: 9781136726019

Puritan politician, lawyer, and lay theologian John Winthrop fled England in 1630 when it looked like Charles I had successfully blocked all hopes of passing Puritan-inspired reforms in Parliament. Leading a migration, he came to New England in the hopes of creating an ideal Puritan community and eventually became the governor of Massachusetts. Winthrop is remembered for his role in the Puritan migration to the colonies and for delivering what is probably the most famous lay sermon in American history, "A Model of Christian Charity." In it he proclaimed that New England would be "a city upon a hill"--an example for future colonies. In John Winthrop: Founding the City upon a Hill, Michael Parker examines the political and religious history of this iconic figure. In this short biography, bolstered by letters, sermons, and maps, John Winthrop introduces students to the colonial world, the Pequot Wars, and the history of American Exceptionalism.

Author: Francis J. Bremer, Genre: Biography & Autobiography, Total Page: 516, Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA, ISBN: 0195179811

The first full-length biography of the first governor of the Massechusetts Bay Colony delves deeply into the life of this seminal figure in the formation of American society and culture.

Author: James G. Moseley, Genre: Biography & Autobiography, Total Page: 216, Publisher: , ISBN: UOM:39015029227595

One of the most famous American journals is that of 17th century Puritan leader John Winthrop. As the first governor of the Massachusetts Bay Colony, an office he held with few interruptions for two decades, he worked to establish a society in which he thought true Christianity could flourish, beyond the reach of the unfaithful Church of England. Winthrop's journal has provided a window into a world that, while unfamiliar, continues to influence our sense of the meaning of America.

Author: Michael Burgan, Genre: Juvenile Nonfiction, Total Page: 120, Publisher: Capstone, ISBN: 0756515912

Describes the life and accomplishments of the governor of the Massachusetts Bay Colony who, driven by his religion, created a place where people lived according to the rules set down in the Bible.

Author: Daniel T. Rodgers, Genre: History, Total Page: 366, Publisher: Princeton University Press, ISBN: 9780691210551

For we must consider that we shall be as a city upon a hill," John Winthrop warned his fellow Puritans at New England's founding in 1630. More than three centuries later, Ronald Reagan remade that passage into a timeless celebration of American promise. How were Winthrop's long-forgotten words reinvented as a central statement of American identity and exceptionalism? In As a City on a Hill, leading American intellectual historian Daniel Rodgers tells the surprising story of one of the most celebrated documents in the canon of the American idea. In doing so, he brings to life the ideas Winthrop's text carried in its own time and the sharply different yearnings that have been attributed to it since. As a City on a Hill shows how much more malleable, more saturated with vulnerability, and less distinctly American Winthrop's "Model of Christian Charity" was than the document that twentieth-century Americans invented. Across almost four centuries, Rodgers traces striking shifts in the meaning of Winthrop's words--from Winthrop's own anxious reckoning with the scrutiny of the world, through Abraham Lincoln's haunting reference to this "almost chosen people," to the "city on a hill" that African Americans hoped to construct in Liberia, to the era of Donald Trump. As a City on a Hill reveals the circuitous, unexpected ways Winthrop's words came to lodge in American consciousness. At the same time, the book offers a probing reflection on how nationalism encourages the invention of "timeless" texts to straighten out the crooked realities of the past.