Author: Matthew Restall, Genre: History, Total Page: 320, Publisher: Cambridge University Press, ISBN: 9781108416405

This second edition is a concise history of Latin America from the Aztecs and Incas to Independence.

Author: Matthew Restall, Genre: History, Total Page: 304, Publisher: Cambridge University Press, ISBN: 9780521761185

Presents the story of how Latin American civilization emerged from the encounter of three great civilizations in the sixteenth century.

Author: Kenneth J. Andrien, Genre: Biography & Autobiography, Total Page: 346, Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield, ISBN: 0842028889

A second edition of this book is now available. The Human Tradition in Colonial Latin America is an anthology of life stories of largely ordinary individuals struggling to forge a life during the unstable colonial period in Latin America. These mini-biographies show the tensions that emerged when the political, social, religious, and economic ideals of the Spanish and Portuguese colonial regimes and the Roman Catholic Church conflicted with the realities of daily life in the Americas. The essays examine subthemes of gender roles; race and ethnicity; conflicts over religious orthodoxy; and crime, violence, and rebellion, while illustrating the overall theme of social order and disorder in a colonial setting. Professor Andrien has carefully selected pieces to comprise a volume that is well balanced in terms of geography, gender, and ethnicity. Written by established scholars, the essays are designed to be readable and interesting to students. Ideal for courses on Colonial Latin American history and the Latin American history survey, The Human Tradition in Colonial Latin America will interest as well as inform students. Contributions by: Rolena Adorno, Kenneth J. Andrien, Peter Blanchard, Christiana Borchart de Moreno, Noble David Cook, Lyman L. Johnson, Grant D. Jones, Mary Karasch, Alida C. Metcalf, Kenneth Mills, Muriel S. Nazzari, Ana Maria Presta, Susan E. Ramirez, Matthew Restall, Ward Stavig, Camilla Townsend, Ann Twinam, and Nancy E. van Deusen."

Author: Kenneth Mills, Genre: History, Total Page: 471, Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, ISBN: 9780742574076

Colonial Latin America: A Documentary History is a sourcebook of primary texts and images intended for students and teachers as well as for scholars and general readers. The book centers upon people-people from different parts of the world who came together to form societies by chance and by design in the years after 1492. This text is designed to encourage a detailed exploration of the cultural development of colonial Latin America through a wide variety of documents and visual materials, most of which have been translated and presented originally for this collection. Colonial Latin America: A Documentary History is a revision of SR Books' popular Colonial Spanish America. The new edition welcomes a third co-editor and, most significantly, embraces Portuguese and Brazilian materials. Other fundamental changes include new documents from Spanish South America, the addition of some key color images, plus six reference maps, and a decision to concentrate entirely upon primary sources. The book is meant to enrich, not repeat, the work of existing texts on this period, and its use of primary sources to focus upon people makes it stand out from other books that have concentrated on the political and economic aspects. The book's illustrations and documents are accompanied by introductions which provide context and invite discussion. These sources feature social changes, puzzling developments, and the experience of living in Spanish and Portuguese American colonial societies. Religion and society are the integral themes of Colonial Latin America. Religion becomes the nexus for much of what has been treated as political, social, economic, and cultural history during this period. Society is just as inclusive, allowing students to meet a variety of individuals-not faceless social groups. While some familiar names and voices are included-conquerors, chroniclers, sculptors, and preachers-other, far less familiar points of view complement and complicate the better-known narratives of this history. In treating Iberia and America, before as well as after their meeting, apparent contradictions emerge as opportunities for understanding; different perspectives become prompts for wider discussion. Other themes include exploration and contact; religious and cultural change; slavery and society, miscegenation, and the formation, consolidation, reform, and collapse of colonial institutions of government and the Church, as well as accompanying changes in economies and labor. This sourcebook allows students and teachers to consider the thoughts and actions of a wide range of people who were making choices and decisions, pursuing ideals, misperceiving each other, experiencing disenchantment, absorbing new pressures, breaking rules as well as following them, and employing strategies of survival which might involve both reconciliation and opposition. Colonial Latin America: A Documentary History has been assembled with teaching and class discussion in mind. The book will be an excellent tool for Latin American history survey courses and for seminars on the colonial period.

Author: Susan Migden Socolow, Genre: History, Total Page: 272, Publisher: Cambridge University Press, ISBN: 9780521196659

A highly readable survey of women's experiences in Latin America from the late fifteenth to the early nineteenth centuries.

Author: Luciane Scarato, Genre: Social Science, Total Page: 194, Publisher: Routledge, ISBN: 9781000093360

Drawing on diverse theoretical perspectives on conviviality, this book considers the ways in which Latin America, a continent marked by deep inequalities, has managed to afford, create, sustain, and contest forms of living together with difference across time and space. Interdisciplinary in approach and presenting studies from various nations across the continent – from the medieval period to the present day – it considers the ways in which Latin America might contribute to our understanding of the relationship between inequality, difference, diversity, and sociability. As such, it will appeal to scholars of history, sociology, geography, anthropology, development studies, postcolonial and social theory with interests in Latin American studies, and in the contingencies and contradictions of living together in profoundly unequal societies.

Author: Kendall Brown, Genre: History, Total Page: 280, Publisher: UNM Press, ISBN: 9780826351074

For twenty-five years, Kendall Brown studied Potosí, Spanish America's greatest silver producer and perhaps the world's most famous mining district. He read about the flood of silver that flowed from its Cerro Rico and learned of the toil of its miners. Potosí symbolized fabulous wealth and unbelievable suffering. New World bullion stimulated the formation of the first world economy but at the same time it had profound consequences for labor, as mine operators and refiners resorted to extreme forms of coercion to secure workers. In many cases the environment also suffered devastating harm. All of this occurred in the name of wealth for individual entrepreneurs, companies, and the ruling states. Yet the question remains of how much economic development mining managed to produce in Latin America and what were its social and ecological consequences. Brown's focus on the legendary mines at Potosí and comparison of its operations to those of other mines in Latin America is a well-written and accessible study that is the first to span the colonial era to the present.

Author: John King, Genre: History, Total Page: 388, Publisher: Cambridge University Press, ISBN: 0521636515

Publisher Description

Author: Mark A. Burkholder, Genre: Latin America, Total Page: 376, Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA, ISBN: UOM:39015032739156

Now in its sixth edition, Colonial Latin America provides a concise study of the history of the Iberian colonies in the New World from their preconquest background to the wars of independence in the early nineteenth century. The new edition of this highly acclaimed text has been revised andupdated to reflect the latest scholarship, with particular emphasis on social and cultural history. It also features a new section on pre-Colonial Africa, to parallel coverage of pre-Colonial Spain and the Americas, as well as new maps and illustrations. Colonial Latin America, Sixth Edition, isindispensable for students who wish to gain a deeper understanding of the fascinating and often colorful history of the cultures, the people, and the struggles that have played a part in shaping Latin America.

Author: Matthew D. O'Hara, Genre: History, Total Page: 318, Publisher: Duke University Press, ISBN: 9780822392101

In colonial Latin America, social identity did not correlate neatly with fixed categories of race and ethnicity. As Imperial Subjects demonstrates, from the early years of Spanish and Portuguese rule, understandings of race and ethnicity were fluid. In this collection, historians offer nuanced interpretations of identity as they investigate how Iberian settlers, African slaves, Native Americans, and their multi-ethnic progeny understood who they were as individuals, as members of various communities, and as imperial subjects. The contributors’ explorations of the relationship between colonial ideologies of difference and the identities historical actors presented span the entire colonial period and beyond: from early contact to the legacy of colonial identities in the new republics of the nineteenth century. The volume includes essays on the major colonial centers of Mexico, Peru, and Brazil, as well as the Caribbean basin and the imperial borderlands. Whether analyzing cases in which the Inquisition found that the individuals before it were “legally” Indians and thus exempt from prosecution, or considering late-eighteenth- and early-nineteenth-century petitions for declarations of whiteness that entitled the mixed-race recipients to the legal and social benefits enjoyed by whites, the book’s contributors approach the question of identity by examining interactions between imperial subjects and colonial institutions. Colonial mandates, rulings, and legislation worked in conjunction with the exercise and negotiation of power between individual officials and an array of social actors engaged in countless brief interactions. Identities emerged out of the interplay between internalized understandings of self and group association and externalized social norms and categories. Contributors. Karen D. Caplan, R. Douglas Cope, Mariana L. R. Dantas, María Elena Díaz, Andrew B. Fisher, Jane Mangan, Jeremy Ravi Mumford, Matthew D. O’Hara, Cynthia Radding, Sergio Serulnikov, Irene Silverblatt, David Tavárez, Ann Twinam