Author: Susan Lobo, Genre: Social Science, Total Page: 546, Publisher: Routledge, ISBN: 9781317346166

This unique reader presents a broad approach to the study of American Indians through the voices and viewpoints of the Native Peoples themselves. Multi-disciplinary and hemispheric in approach, it draws on ethnography, biography, journalism, art, and poetry to familiarize students with the historical and present day experiences of native peoples and nations throughout North and South America–all with a focus on themes and issues that are crucial within Indian Country today. For courses in Introduction to American Indians in departments of Native American Studies/American Indian Studies, Anthropology, American Studies, Sociology, History, Women's Studies.

Author: Alison Owings, Genre: Social Science, Total Page: 392, Publisher: Rutgers University Press, ISBN: 9780813550961

In Indian Voices, Alison Owings takes readers on a fresh journey across America, east to west, north to south, and around again. Owings's most recent oral history—engagingly written in a style that entertains and informs—documents what Native Americans say about themselves, their daily lives, and the world around them. Young and old from many tribal nations speak with candor, insight, and (unknown to many non-Natives) humor about what it is like to be a Native American in the twenty-first century. Through intimate interviews many also express their thoughts about the sometimes staggeringly ignorant, if often well-meaning, non-Natives they encounter—some who do not realize Native Americans still exist, much less that they speak English, have cell phones, use the Internet, and might attend powwows and power lunches. Indian Voices, an inspiring and important contribution to the literature about the original Americans, will make every reader rethink the past—and present—of the United States.

Author: Lisa Charleyboy, Genre: Young Adult Nonfiction, Total Page: 250, Publisher: Annick Press, ISBN: 9781554516889

A highly-acclaimed anthology about growing up NativeÑnow in paperback. *Best Books of 2014, American Indians in ChildrenÕs Literature *Best Book of 2014, Center for the Study of Multicultural Literature *2015 USBBY Outstanding International Book Honor List A collection truly universal in its themes, Dreaming in Indian will shatter commonly held stereotypes about Native peoples and offers readers a unique insight into a community often misunderstood and misrepresented by the mainstream media. Native artists, including acclaimed author Joseph Boyden, renowned visual artist Bunky Echo Hawk, and stand-up comedian Ryan McMahon, contribute thoughtful and heartfelt pieces on their experiences growing up Native. Whether addressing the effects of residential schools, calling out bullies through personal manifestos, or simply citing their hopes for the future, this book refuses to shy away from difficult topics. Insightful, thought-provoking, brutallyÑand beautifullyÑhonest, this book is sure to appeal to young adults everywhere. ÒNot to be missed.ÓÑSchool Library Journal, *starred review ÒÉa uniquely valuable resource.Ó ÑKirkus Reviews, *starred review ÒÉ wide-ranging and emotionally potent ÉÓÑPublishers Weekly

Author: Mark A Nicholas, Genre: History, Total Page: 208, Publisher: Routledge, ISBN: 9781315509358

Integrates Native American perspectives into American history Native Voices is a source reader that covers the entire span of Native American history. It offers documents for readers to evaluate the Native Voice across the American continent and in parts of Latin America. Each document sheds light on Native North America and provides readers with the Native American perspective of their history. The organization of Native Voices and its readings are designed to correlate with First Americans: A History of Native Peoples, MySearchLab is a part of the Nicholas program. Research and writing tools, including access to academic journals, help students understand Native American history in even greater depth.

Author: Steven Mintz, Genre: History, Total Page: 266, Publisher: Wiley-Blackwell, ISBN: 1881089592

An introduction synthesizes the latest anthropological, archaeological, historical, and sociological scholarship and the 95 carefully edited selections provide students with an overview of Native American history from the earliest migrations to the present. The volume includes a chronology, glossary, and bibliography, making it a valuable teaching tool.

Author: Lisa Charleyboy, Genre: Young Adult Nonfiction, Total Page: 250, Publisher: Annick Press, ISBN: 9781554519590

Whether looking back to a troubled past or welcoming a hopeful future, the powerful voices of Indigenous women across North America resound in this book. In the same style as the best-selling Dreaming in Indian, #Not Your Princess presents an eclectic collection of poems, essays, interviews, and art that combine to express the experience of being a Native woman. Stories of abuse, humiliation, and stereotyping are countered by the voices of passionate women making themselves heard and demanding change. Sometimes angry, often reflective, but always strong, the women in this book will give teen readers insight into the lives of women who, for so long, have been virtually invisible.

Author: Tommy Orange, Genre: Fiction, Total Page: 256, Publisher: McClelland & Stewart, ISBN: 9780771073021

Here is a voice we have never heard--a voice full of poetry and rage, exploding onto the page with stunning urgency and force. Here is a story of several people, each of whom has private reasons for travelling to the Big Oakland Powwow. Jacquie Red Feather is newly sober and trying to make it back to the family she left behind in shame. Dene Oxendene is pulling his life together after his uncle's death and has come to work at the powwow to honour his uncle's memory. Opal Viola Victoria Bear Shield has come to watch her nephew Orvil Red Feather, who has taught himself traditional Indian dance through YouTube videos and has come to the powwow to dance in public for the very first time. There will be glorious communion, and a spectacle of sacred tradition and pageantry. And there will be sacrifice, and heroism, and unspeakable loss. Fierce, angry, funny, heartbreaking, There There is a relentlessly paced multi-generational story about violence and recovery, memory and identity, and the beauty and despair woven into the history of a nation and its people. An unforgettable debut.

Author: Lois Crozier-Hogle, Genre: Social Science, Total Page: 288, Publisher: University of Texas Press, ISBN: 9780292789647

Surviving in Two Worlds brings together the voices of twenty-six Native American leaders. The interviewees come from a variety of tribal backgrounds and include such national figures as Oren Lyons, Arvol Looking Horse, John Echohawk, William Demmert, Clifford Trafzer, Greg Sarris, and Roxanne Swentzell. Their interviews are divided into five sections, grouped around the themes of tradition, history and politics, healing, education, and culture. They take readers into their lives, their dreams and fears, their philosophies and experiences, and show what they are doing to assure the survival of their peoples and cultures, as well as the earth as a whole. Their analyses of the past and present, and especially their counsels for the future, are timely and urgent.

Author: Susan Belasco, Genre: Literary Criticism, Total Page: 1864, Publisher: John Wiley & Sons, ISBN: 9781119653349

A comprehensive, chronological overview of American literature in three scholarly and authoritative volumes A Companion to American Literature traces the history and development of American literature from its early origins in Native American oral tradition to 21st century digital literature. This comprehensive three-volume set brings together contributions from a diverse international team of accomplished young scholars and established figures in the field. Contributors explore a broad range of topics in historical, cultural, political, geographic, and technological contexts, engaging the work of both well-known and non-canonical writers of every period. Volume One is an inclusive and geographically expansive examination of early American literature, applying a range of cultural and historical approaches and theoretical models to a dramatically expanded canon of texts. Volume Two covers American literature between 1820 and 1914, focusing on the development of print culture and the literary marketplace, the emergence of various literary movements, and the impact of social and historical events on writers and writings of the period. Spanning the 20th and early 21st centuries, Volume Three studies traditional areas of American literature as well as the literature from previously marginalized groups and contemporary writers often overlooked by scholars. This inclusive and comprehensive study of American literature: Examines the influences of race, ethnicity, gender, class, and disability on American literature Discusses the role of technology in book production and circulation, the rise of literacy, and changing reading practices and literary forms Explores a wide range of writings in multiple genres, including novels, short stories, dramas, and a variety of poetic forms, as well as autobiographies, essays, lectures, diaries, journals, letters, sermons, histories, and graphic narratives. Provides a thematic index that groups chapters by contexts and illustrates their links across different traditional chronological boundaries A Companion to American Literature is a valuable resource for students coming to the subject for the first time or preparing for field examinations, instructors in American literature courses, and scholars with more specialized interests in specific authors, genres, movements, or periods.

Author: Robert Bensen, Genre: Social Science, Total Page: 304, Publisher: University of Arizona Press, ISBN: 0816520127

Sometimes the losses of childhood can be recovered only in the flight of the dragonfly.Native American children have long been subject to removal from their homes for placement in residential schools and, more recently, in foster or adoptive homes. The governments of both the United States and Canada, having reduced Native nations to the legal status of dependent children, historically have asserted a surrogate parentalism over Native children themselves. Children of the Dragonfly is the first anthology to document this struggle for cultural survival on both sides of the U.S.-Canadian border. Through autobiography and interviews, fiction and traditional tales, official transcripts and poetry, these voicesÑ Seneca, Cherokee, Mohawk, Navajo, and many othersÑ weave powerful accounts of struggle and loss into a moving testimony to perseverance and survival. Invoking the dragonfly spirit of Zuni legend who helps children restore a way of life that has been taken from them, the anthology explores the breadth of the conflict about Native childhood. Included are works of contemporary authors Sherman Alexie, Joy Harjo, Luci Tapahonso, and others; classic writers Zitkala-Sa and E. Pauline Johnson; and contributions from twenty important new writers as well. They take readers from the boarding school movement of the 1870s to the Sixties Scoop in Canada and the Indian Child Welfare Act of 1978 in the United States. They also spotlight the tragic consequences of racist practices such as the suppression of Indian identity in government schools and the campaign against Indian childbearing through involuntary sterilization. CONTENTS Part 1. Traditional Stories and Lives Severt Young Bear (Lakota) and R. D. Theisz, To Say "Child" Zitkala-Sa (Yankton Sioux), The Toad and the Boy Delia Oshogay (Chippewa), Oshkikwe's Baby Michele Dean Stock (Seneca), The Seven Dancers Mary Ulmer Chiltoskey (Cherokee), Goldilocks Thereafter Marietta Brady (Navajo), Two Stories Part 2. Boarding and Residential Schools Embe (Marianna Burgess), from Stiya: or, a Carlisle Indian Girl at Home Black Bear (Blackfeet), Who Am I? E. Pauline Johnson (Mohawk), As It Was in the Beginning Lee Maracle (Stoh:lo), Black Robes Gordon D. Henry, Jr. (White Earth Chippewa), The Prisoner of Haiku Luci Tapahonso (Navajo), The Snakeman Joy Harjo (Muskogee), The Woman Who Fell from the Sky Part 3. Child Welfare and Health Services Problems That American Indian Families Face in Raising Their Children, United States Senate, April 8 and 9, 1974 Mary TallMountain (Athabaskan), Five Poems Virginia Woolfclan, Missing Sister Lela Northcross Wakely (Potawatomi/Kickapoo), Indian Health Sherman Alexie (Spokane/Coeur d'Alene), from Indian Killer Milton Lee (Cheyenne River Sioux) and Jamie Lee, The Search for Indian Part 4. Children of the Dragonfly Peter Cuch (Ute), I Wonder What the Car Looked Like S. L. Wilde (Anishnaabe), A Letter to My Grandmother Eric Gansworth (Onondaga), It Goes Something Like This Kimberly Roppolo (Cherokee/Choctaw/Creek), Breeds and Outlaws Phil Young (Cherokee) and Robert Bensen, Wetumka Lawrence Sampson (Delaware/Eastern Band Cherokee), The Long Road Home Beverley McKiver (Ojibway), When the Heron Speaks Joyce carlEtta Mandrake (White Earth Chippewa), Memory Lane Is the Next Street Over Alan Michelson (Mohawk), Lost Tribe Patricia Aqiimuk Paul (Inupiaq), The Connection Terry Trevor (Cherokee/Delaware/Seneca), Pushing up the Sky Annalee Lucia Bensen (Mohegan/Cherokee), Two Dragonfly Dream Songs