Author: Richard J. Ellis, Genre: Political Science, Total Page: 586, Publisher: Routledge, ISBN: 9781136980596

Our understanding of the politics of the presidency is greatly enhanced by viewing it through a developmental lens, analyzing how historical turns have shaped the modern institution. The Development of the American Presidency pays great attention to that historical weight but is organized topically and conceptually with the constitutional origins and political development of the presidency its central focus. Through comprehensive and in-depth coverage, this text looks at how the presidency has evolved in relation to the public, to Congress, to the Executive branch, and to the law, showing at every step how different aspects of the presidency have followed distinct trajectories of change. All the while, Ellis illustrates the institutional relationships and tensions through stories about particular individuals and specific political conflicts. Ellis's own classroom pedagogy of promoting active learning and critical thinking is well reflected in these pages. Each chapter begins with a narrative account of some illustrative puzzle that brings to life a central concept. A wealth of photos, figures, and tables allow for the visual presentations of concepts. A companion website not only acts as a further resources base—directing students to primary documents, newspapers, and data sources—but also presents interactive timelines, practice quizzes, and key terms to help students master the book's lessons.

Author: Lori Cox Han, Genre: Political Science, Total Page: 305, Publisher: Routledge, ISBN: 9781136994593

The study of the American presidency, both as a political institution and the men who have held the office, is one of the most fascinating and dynamic fields of study within American government. New Directions in the American Presidency takes a current look at the various issues facing the presidency and provides a "state of the art" overview of current trends in the field of presidency research. This edited volume covers all of the standard topics necessary for use in an undergraduate-level presidency course or a graduate-level seminar while also bringing together key disciplinary debates and treatment of important current real-world developments. Each chapter is written with students in mind so that it remains accessible, interesting, and engaging and does not inundate readers with pedantic or jargonistic terms. This will undoubtedly become a key resource to engage students in the exciting debates over scholarship on presidential politics.

Author: Sidney M. Milkis, Genre: Political Science, Total Page: 632, Publisher: CQ Press, ISBN: 9781071824634

The American Presidency examines the constitutional foundation of the executive office and the social, economic, political, and international forces that have reshaped it along with the influence individual presidents have had. Authors Sidney Milkis and Michael Nelson look at each presidency broadly, focusing on how individual presidents have sought to navigate the complex and ever-changing terrain of the executive office and revealing the major developments that launched a modern presidency at the dawn of the twentieth century. By connecting presidential conduct to the defining eras of American history and the larger context of politics and government in the United States, this award-winning book offers perspective and insight on the limitations and possibilities of presidential power.

Author: Jeff Menne, Genre: Social Science, Total Page: 280, Publisher: Routledge, ISBN: 9781135049911

The contention of Film and the American Presidency is that over the twentieth century the cinema has been a silent partner in setting the parameters of what we might call the presidential imaginary. This volume surveys the partnership in its longevity, placing stress on especially iconic presidents such as Lincoln and FDR. The contributions to this collection probe the rich interactions between these high institutions of culture and politics—Hollywood and the presidency—and argue that not only did Hollywood acting become an idiom for presidential style, but that Hollywood early on understood its own identity through the presidency’s peculiar mix of national epic and unified protagonist. Additionally, they contend that studios often made their films to sway political outcomes; that the performance of presidential personae has been constrained by the kinds of bodies (for so long, white and male) that have occupied the office, such that presidential embodiment obscures the body politic; and that Hollywood and the presidency may finally be nothing more than two privileged figures of media-age power.

Author: Tevi Troy, Genre: History, Total Page: 255, Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield, ISBN: 0742508269

Intellectuals and the American Presidency examines the complex relationships between America's presidents and intellectuals since 1960. From Arthur Schlesinger's work in John Kennedy's campaign and administration to Daniel Patrick Moynihan's role as the Democrat in the Nixon White House, through Sidney Blumenthal's efforts to secure intellectual support for a scandal-plagued Bill Clinton, presidents have had to address the question of intellectual support. How they did this has helped to shape their presidencies and their historical reputations. Using both popular sources and some never-before-used archived material, Intellectuals and the American Presidency looks at the advisers who served as liaisons to the academic community, the presidents' views of those intellectuals, and how they fit in with the presidents' plans. In this bipartisan study, political insider Tevi Troy analyzes how American presidents have used intellectuals to shape their images and advance their agendas.

Author: Stephen F Knott, Genre: , Total Page: 296, Publisher: , ISBN: 0700630392

An office envisioned by George Washington and Alexander Hamilton as a source of national pride and unity instead sows division and discord.

Author: Forrest McDonald, Genre: History, Total Page: 516, Publisher: Lawrence, Kan. : University Press of Kansas, ISBN: UOM:39015029098400

McDonald explores how and why the presidency has evolved into such a complex and powerful institution, unlike any other in the world. He chronicles the presidency's creation, implementation, and evolution and explains why it's still working today despite its many perceived afflictions.

Author: Lori Cox Han, Genre: Biography & Autobiography, Total Page: 488, Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA, ISBN: 0190611464

"Presidents and the American Presidency engages students in the study of the presidency through an exploration of both the political institution and the men who have held the office. Considering both the strengths and the weaknesses of the office, authors Lori Cox Han and Diane J. Heith move beyond purely theoretical analysis to examine the real-life, day-to-day responsibilities and challenges that go with the job. Memos, oral histories, detail analyses, etc. pulled from Presidential Libraries will bring to life the study of the Presidency. Contemporary Presidencies will be emphasized to allow the students to see the concepts presented in the text at work in an administration with which they are familiar. The text will cover all of the standard concepts presented in the course, and will do so by integrating the latest qualitative and quantitative research in the field"--

Author: Lara M. Brown, Genre: History, Total Page: 474, Publisher: Cambria Press, ISBN: 9781604977028

"Dr. Lara Brown's Jockeying for the American Presidency is one of the best books this discipline has contributed to the study of presidential nominations and elections. Her book has three especially attractive features. First, she correctly conceives of ambition as the theoretical base and she roots that ambition early in presidential aspirants' political careers. Second, she is very clear in the interaction between individual goals, here ambition for the Oval Office, and the development of partisan and electoral institutions. Third, as necessitated by the small number of nominations and the endogeneity among ambition, opportunity, and institution, her study is deeply historical. But history here is not just good research design; it animates the study and makes it such a pleasure to read."---John H. Aldrich, Duke University "Lara Brown sheds new light on presidential politics in her analysis of presidential aspirants. She argues that instead of being shaped by political party and external events, successful nominees actively shape their political parties and create their own political circumstances. Her richly detailed portraits of both winners and losers throughout American history undergird her theoretical contributions. Anyone interested in presidential elections will benefit greatly from reading this book."---James P. Pfiffner, George Mason University "This book will compel scholars to take a new look at the role of "political opportunism" in the presidential selection process. Lara Brown provides a fresh, innovative exploration of the roots of opportunism, one that challenges conventional wisdom as it advances our understanding of this complex topic."---Michael A. Genovese, Loyola Marymount University "Lara Brown links candidate opportunism to political experience, electoral success, partisan change, and institutional development. Admirably, she also seeks to contextualize opportunistic behavior---to be sensitive to history, norms, and contingent events. This is at bottom a study about candidate qualities---human nature, political character, the appetite for power---and the consequences of these for the successful pursuit of the presidential office. This, I believe, constitutes the core of the study and its greatest strength. In fact, in some ways this book is one of a small handful of works in recent memory to take very seriously the political and institutional implications of human nature---ambition, self-interest, opportunism---since the Federalist Papers."---Scott C. James. UCLA

Author: Richard J. Ellis, Genre: History, Total Page: 313, Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield, ISBN: 0847694992

At a time when the institution of the presidency seems in a state of almost permanent crisis, it is particularly important to understand what sort of an institution the framers of the Constitution thought they were creating. Founding the American Presidency offers a first-hand view of the minds of the founders by bringing together extensive selections from the constitutional convention in Philadelphia as well as representative selections from the subsequent debates over ratification. Organized topically, the book focuses on those issues of executive power that most deeply concerned and often sharply divided the founders, including the electoral college and impeachment, the presidential term and reeligibility, the veto power and war powers, the power of appointment and the power of pardon. EllisO judicious selections mean that teachers and students no longer need to settle for the meager rations of a Federalist paper or two supplemented by a quick summary of the founders' thoughts before being fast-forwarded to the contemporary presidency. Pointed discussion questions provoke students to consider new perspectives on the presidency. Ideal for all courses on the presidency, the book is also important for all citizens who want to understand not only the past but the future of the American presidency.