Author: , Genre: History, Total Page: 536, Publisher: John Wiley & Sons, ISBN: 9781118617731

The History of Texas is fully revised and updated in this fifth edition to reflect the latest scholarship in its coverage of Texas history from the pre-Columbian era to the present. Fully revised to reflect the most recent scholarly findings Offers extensive coverage of twentieth-century Texas history Includes an overview of Texas history up to the Election of 2012 Provides online resources for students and instructors, including a test bank, maps, presentation slides, and more

Author: Richard A. Holland, Genre: History, Total Page: 256, Publisher: University of Texas Press, ISBN: 9780292714298

Provides personality profiles, historical essays, and first-person reminiscences of the history of the University of Texas. Topics include recurring attacks on the school by politicians and regents, the institution's history of segregation and struggles to become a diverse university, the sixties' protest movements, and the Tower sniper shooting.

Author: Stephen Harrigan, Genre: History, Total Page: 944, Publisher: University of Texas Press, ISBN: 9780292759510

The story of Texas is the story of struggle and triumph in a land of extremes. It is a story of drought and flood, invasion and war, boom and bust, and of the myriad peoples who, over centuries of conflict, gave rise to a place that has helped shape the identity of the United States and the destiny of the world. “I couldn’t believe Texas was real,” the painter Georgia O’Keeffe remembered of her first encounter with the Lone Star State. It was, for her, “the same big wonderful thing that oceans and the highest mountains are.” Big Wonderful Thing invites us to walk in the footsteps of ancient as well as modern people along the path of Texas’s evolution. Blending action and atmosphere with impeccable research, New York Times best-selling author Stephen Harrigan brings to life with novelistic immediacy the generations of driven men and women who shaped Texas, including Spanish explorers, American filibusters, Comanche warriors, wildcatters, Tejano activists, and spellbinding artists—all of them taking their part in the creation of a place that became not just a nation, not just a state, but an indelible idea. Written in fast-paced prose, rich with personal observation and a passionate sense of place, Big Wonderful Thing calls to mind the literary spirit of Robert Hughes writing about Australia or Shelby Foote about the Civil War. Like those volumes it is a big book about a big subject, a book that dares to tell the whole glorious, gruesome, epically sprawling story of Texas.

Author: T. R. Fehrenbach, Genre: History, Total Page: 792, Publisher: Open Road Media, ISBN: 9781497609709

The definitive account of the incomparable Lone Star state by the author of Fire & Blood: A History of Mexico. T. R. Fehrenbach is a native Texan, military historian and the author of several important books about the region, but none as significant as this work, arguably the best single volume about Texas ever published. His account of America's most turbulent state offers a view that only an insider could capture. From the native tribes who lived there to the Spanish and French soldiers who wrested the territory for themselves, then to the dramatic ascension of the republic of Texas and the saga of the Civil War years. Fehrenbach describes the changes that disturbed the state as it forged its unique character. Most compelling is the one quality that would remain forever unchanged through centuries of upheaval: the courage of the men and women who struggled to realize their dreams in The Lone Star State.

Author: Walter Prescott Webb, Genre: Texas, Total Page: , Publisher: , ISBN: UVA:X000451094

Vol. 3: A supplement, edited by Eldon Stephen Branda. Includes bibliographical references.

Author: Bryan Burrough, Genre: History, Total Page: 416, Publisher: Penguin, ISBN: 9781984880116

A New York Times bestseller! “Lively and absorbing. . ." — The New York Times Book Review "Engrossing." —Wall Street Journal “Entertaining and well-researched . . . ” —Houston Chronicle Three noted Texan writers combine forces to tell the real story of the Alamo, dispelling the myths, exploring why they had their day for so long, and explaining why the ugly fight about its meaning is now coming to a head. Every nation needs its creation myth, and since Texas was a nation before it was a state, it's no surprise that its myths bite deep. There's no piece of history more important to Texans than the Battle of the Alamo, when Davy Crockett and a band of rebels went down in a blaze of glory fighting for independence from Mexico, losing the battle but setting Texas up to win the war. However, that version of events, as Forget the Alamo definitively shows, owes more to fantasy than reality. Just as the site of the Alamo was left in ruins for decades, its story was forgotten and twisted over time, with the contributions of Tejanos--Texans of Mexican origin, who fought alongside the Anglo rebels--scrubbed from the record, and the origin of the conflict over Mexico's push to abolish slavery papered over. Forget the Alamo provocatively explains the true story of the battle against the backdrop of Texas's struggle for independence, then shows how the sausage of myth got made in the Jim Crow South of the late nineteenth and early twentieth century. As uncomfortable as it may be to hear for some, celebrating the Alamo has long had an echo of celebrating whiteness. In the past forty-some years, waves of revisionists have come at this topic, and at times have made real progress toward a more nuanced and inclusive story that doesn't alienate anyone. But we are not living in one of those times; the fight over the Alamo's meaning has become more pitched than ever in the past few years, even violent, as Texas's future begins to look more and more different from its past. It's the perfect time for a wise and generous-spirited book that shines the bright light of the truth into a place that's gotten awfully dark.

Author: Steven Jent, Genre: History, Total Page: 250, Publisher: Taylor Trade Publishing, ISBN: 9781461708537

If you love history and want to amaze your family and colleagues with your prodigious knowledge of Lone Star lore, this book is just what you need. A Browser's Book of Texas History is a day-by-day collection of more than 500 incident-some famous, some obscure-that have made Texas the most remarkable state in the Union. Even if you're a dedicated historian or an old-time Texan, you're likely to find something surprising, amusing, thought provoking, or just plain odd. With this book you can start every day of the year with a concise entry from the chronicles of this unique state, which just seems to naturally breed colorful people and bigger-than-life events.

Author: Frank White Johnson, Genre: Texas, Total Page: 704, Publisher: , ISBN: UOM:39015008369509

Vols. l and 3 are books; vols. 2, 4, 5 are microfiche.

Author: Ernest Wallace, Genre: History, Total Page: 337, Publisher: Texas State Historical Assn, ISBN: 0876111886

This is a collection of 141 significant documents with scholarly introductions.

Author: Henderson King Yoakum, Genre: History, Total Page: 252, Publisher: Jazzybee Verlag, ISBN: 9783849674670

This is a valuable contribution to general history, and especially to the history of the Uniteed States. The past of Texas is here brought down and covers a period of 161 years—the greatest prominence being given to the first half of the 19th century. Several familiar names figure in the work, respecting whom, in connection with Texas, the reader will naturally desire to learn what is here told. This is one of the most authentic and valuable books, in connection with the general affairs of Texas, that can be found; in which nothing is stated upon individual responsibility—everything in it is sustained by the official documents. This is volume one out of two.