Author: Christopher Scarre, Genre: Agriculture, Prehistoric, Total Page: 784, Publisher: Thames & Hudson, ISBN: 0500290644

The Human Past has established itself as the most thorough and authoritative introductory survey of human prehistory and the development of civilizations around the globe, adopted by colleges and universities worldwide. With a clear and logical framework, and written by an international team of 24 acknowledged experts, this unique textbook provides a comprehensive overview of world prehistory through a series of chapters focusing on individual regions and time periods that presents the vast panorama of human social, cultural and economic development over the past three million years. This new edition has been completely revised and updated, with more colour illustrations, to take account of new discoveries and developments, including what the analysis of ancient DNA tells us about our evolution; the latest theories about the domestication of key plants and animals, including rice and maize; and new thinking on the earliest Paleoindian hunting strategies.

Author: Mark Q Sutton, Genre: Social Science, Total Page: 432, Publisher: Routledge, ISBN: 9781317350095

Illuminating the world of archaeology. Archaeology conveys the excitement of archaeological discovery and explains how archaeologists think as they scientifically find, analyze, and interpret evidence. The main objective of this text is to provide an introduction to the broad and fascinating world of archaeology from the scientific perspective. Discussions on the theoretical aspects of archaeology, as well as the practical applications of what is learned about the past, have been updated and expanded upon in this fourth edition. Learning Goals Upon completing this book, readers will be able to: Discuss the theoretical aspects of archaeology. Apply what has been learned about the past. Identify the various perspectives archaeologists have.

Author: Martin Porr, Genre: Social Science, Total Page: 352, Publisher: Routledge, ISBN: 9781000761931

Interrogating Human Origins encourages new critical engagements with the study of human origins, broadening the range of approaches to bring in postcolonial theories, and begin to explore the decolonisation of this complex topic. The collection of chapters presented in this volume creates spaces for expansion of critical and unexpected conversations about human origins research. Authors from a variety of disciplines and research backgrounds, many of whom have strayed beyond their usual disciplinary boundaries to offer their unique perspectives, all circle around the big questions of what it means to be and become human. Embracing and encouraging diversity is a recognition of the deep complexities of human existence in the past and the present, and it is vital to critical scholarship on this topic. This book constitutes a starting point for increased interrogation of the important and wide-ranging field of research into human origins. It will be of interest to scholars across multiple disciplines, and particularly to those seeking to understand our ancient past through a more diverse lens.

Author: David Reich, Genre: DNA, Total Page: 368, Publisher: Oxford University Press, ISBN: 9780198821250

David Reich describes how the revolution in the ability to sequence ancient DNA has changed our understanding of the deep human past. This book tells the emerging story of our often surprising ancestry - the extraordinary ancient migrations and mixtures of populations that have made us who we are.

Author: Robyn E. Cutright, Genre: Social Science, Total Page: 297, Publisher: University Alabama Press, ISBN: 9780817359850

A sweeping overview of how and what humans have eaten in their long history as a species The Story of Food in the Human Past: How What We Ate Made Us Who We Are uses case studies from recent archaeological research to tell the story of food in human prehistory. Beginning with the earliest members of our genus, Robyn E. Cutright investigates the role of food in shaping who we are as humans during the emergence of modern Homo sapiens and through major transitions in human prehistory such as the development of agriculture and the emergence of complex societies. This fascinating study begins with a discussion of how food shaped humans in evolutionary terms by examining what makes human eating unique, the use of fire to cook, and the origins of cuisine as culture and adaptation through the example of Neandertals. The second part of the book describes how cuisine was reshaped when humans domesticated plants and animals and examines how food expressed ancient social structures and identities such as gender, class, and ethnicity. Cutright shows how food took on special meaning in feasts and religious rituals and also pays attention to the daily preparation and consumption of food as central to human society. Cutright synthesizes recent paleoanthropological and archaeological research on ancient diet and cuisine and complements her research on daily diet, culinary practice, and special-purpose mortuary and celebratory meals in the Andes with comparative case studies from around the world to offer readers a holistic view of what humans ate in the past and what that reveals about who we are.

Author: Peter N. Peregrine, Genre: Social Science, Total Page: 542, Publisher: , ISBN: 0130281727

World Prehistory provides a complete overview of world prehistory, human origins and the spread of humans across the globe. Written in a conversational style, the volume provides comprehensive coverage of regional archaeological sequences, a focused examination of food production, social complexity, and the spread of civilization. The volume addresses the study of world prehistory, the archaeological record, process of archaeological research, the dawn of humanity, the first humans and the origins of culture, the emergence of modern humans, the upper Paleolithic world, regional diversification, the evolution of food production, the rise of civilization and trends in world prehistory. For those interested in prehistoric humans and their culture.

Author: S. Fuller, Genre: Social Science, Total Page: 265, Publisher: Springer, ISBN: 9780230316720

Social thinkers in all fields are faced with one unavoidable question: What does it mean to be human in the 21st century? This ambitious and groundbreaking book provides the first synthesis of historical, philosophical and sociological insights needed to address this question in a thoughtful and creative manner.

Author: Brian Fagan, Genre: Juvenile Nonfiction, Total Page: 192, Publisher: Oxford University Press, ISBN: 9780198028079

Including eccentric professors and adventuring fortune hunters of old and highly trained scientists of today, Archaeologists collects together biographies of more than 30 archaeologists of the past two centuries. In the process, Archaeologists presents an engaging portrait of how digging for treasure evolved into the respected and vital science we know today. Some of the archaeologists profiled include: * Giovanni Belzoni, the 19th-century archaeologist who brought the head of Ramesses II back to England * Heinrich Schliemann, the modern discoverer of prehistoric Greece whose excavations included Mycenae and the ancient city of Troy * Howard Carter, who discovered King Tut's tomb * Mary and Louis Leakey, whose discovery of humanoid fossils placed human evolution's beginning in Africa From the romance of golden pharaohs and lost civilizations to computers, tree ring dating, and numerous other scientific methods, Archaeologists is a fascinating look at the explorers of the human past.

Author: Rob Swigart, Genre: Social Science, Total Page: 224, Publisher: Berghahn Books, ISBN: 9781789206128

In unforgettable stories of the human journey, a combination of storytelling and dialog underscore an excavation into the deep past of human development and its consequences. Through a first encounter between a Neanderthal woman and the Modern Human she called Traveler, to the emergence and destruction of the world’s first cities, Mixed Harvest tells the tale of the Sedentary Divide, the most significant event since modern humans emerged. Rob Swigart’s latest work humanizes the rapid transition to agriculture and pastoralism with a grounding in the archaeological record.

Author: Paul Bahn, Genre: Social Science, Total Page: 576, Publisher: Smithsonian Institution, ISBN: 9781588345912

Epic in scope, yet filled with detail, this illustrated guide takes readers through the whole of our human past. Spanning the dawn of human civilization through the present, it provides a tour of every site of key archaeological importance. From the prehistoric cave paintings of Lascaux to Tutankhamun's tomb, from the buried city of Pompeii to China's Terracotta Army, all of the world's most iconic sites and discoveries are here. So too are the lesser-known yet equally important finds, such as the recent discoveries of our oldest known human ancestors and of the world's oldest-known temple, Göbekli Tepe in Turkey. A masterful combination of succinct analysis and driving narrative, this book also addresses the questions that inevitably arise as we gradually learn more about the history of our species. Written by an international team of archaeological experts and richly illustrated throughout, Archaeology: The Essential Guide to Our Human Past offers an unparalleled insight into the origins of humankind.