Author: Annette Lareau, Genre: Social Science, Total Page: 461, Publisher: Univ of California Press, ISBN: 9780520271425

This book is a powerful portrayal of class inequalities in the United States. It contains insightful analysis of the processes through which inequality is reproduced, and it frankly engages with methodological and analytic dilemmas usually glossed over in academic texts.

Author: Annette Lareau, Genre: History, Total Page: 331, Publisher: Univ of California Press, ISBN: 9780520239500

Drawing on in-depth observations of black and white middle-class, working-class and poor families, this study explores the fact that class does make a difference in the lives and futures of American children and offers a picture of childhood in the 21st century.

Author: Annette Lareau, Genre: Social Science, Total Page: 343, Publisher: Univ of California Press, ISBN: 0520930479

Class does make a difference in the lives and futures of American children. Drawing on in-depth observations of black and white middle-class, working-class, and poor families, Unequal Childhoods explores this fact, offering a picture of childhood today. Here are the frenetic families managing their children's hectic schedules of "leisure" activities; and here are families with plenty of time but little economic security. Lareau shows how middle-class parents, whether black or white, engage in a process of "concerted cultivation" designed to draw out children's talents and skills, while working-class and poor families rely on "the accomplishment of natural growth," in which a child's development unfolds spontaneously—as long as basic comfort, food, and shelter are provided. Each of these approaches to childrearing brings its own benefits and its own drawbacks. In identifying and analyzing differences between the two, Lareau demonstrates the power, and limits, of social class in shaping the lives of America's children. The first edition of Unequal Childhoods was an instant classic, portraying in riveting detail the unexpected ways in which social class influences parenting in white and African-American families. A decade later, Annette Lareau has revisited the same families and interviewed the original subjects to examine the impact of social class in the transition to adulthood.

Author: Helen Penn, Genre: Education, Total Page: 244, Publisher: Psychology Press, ISBN: 0415321026

While problems of childhood poverty are most widespread in developing countries, formidable inequalities exist in more prosperous countries. A major aim of the book is to address the question of unequal childhoodsand the ways in which they are.

Author: Kalwant Bhopal, Genre: Education, Total Page: 240, Publisher: Routledge, ISBN: 9781134580132

Based upon empirical research, it portrays the lives of children aged 11-12 and shows how families connect children in different ways both in the household but also in their wider kinship networks.

Author: Annette Lareau, Genre: Social Science, Total Page: 304, Publisher: University of Chicago Press, ISBN: 9780226806600

A down-to-earth, practical guide for interview and participant observation and analysis. In-depth interviews and close observation are essential to the work of social scientists, but inserting one’s researcher-self into the lives of others can be daunting, especially early on. Esteemed sociologist Annette Lareau is here to help. Lareau’s clear, insightful, and personal guide is not your average methods text. It promises to reduce researcher anxiety while illuminating the best methods for first-rate research practice. As the title of this book suggests, Lareau considers listening to be the core element of interviewing and observation. A researcher must listen to people as she collects data, listen to feedback as she describes what she is learning, listen to the findings of others as they delve into the existing literature on topics, and listen to herself in order to sift and prioritize some aspects of the study over others. By listening in these different ways, researchers will discover connections, reconsider assumptions, catch mistakes, develop and assess new ideas, weigh priorities, ponder new directions, and undertake numerous adjustments—all of which will make their contributions clearer and more valuable. Accessibly written and full of practical, easy-to-follow guidance, this book will help both novice and experienced researchers to do their very best work. Qualitative research is an inherently uncertain project, but with Lareau’s help, you can alleviate anxiety and focus on success.

Author: Iram Siraj, Genre: Education, Total Page: 330, Publisher: Cambridge University Press, ISBN: 9781107018051

Examines the impact that parents and schools have on disadvantaged children who perform against the odds.

Author: Ingrid Paus-Hasebrink, Genre: Communication, Total Page: 314, Publisher: Springer, ISBN: 9783030026530

This open access book presents a qualitative longitudinal panel-study on child and adolescent socialisation in socially disadvantaged families. The study traces how children and their parents make sense of media within the context of their everyday life over twelve years (from 2005 to 2017) and provides a unique perspective on the role of different socialisation contexts, drawing on rich data from a broad range of qualitative methods. Using a theoretical framework and methodological approach that can be applied transnationally, it sheds light on the complex interplay of factors which shape children’s socialisation and media usage in multiple ways. .

Author: Ellie Lee, Genre: Social Science, Total Page: 253, Publisher: Springer, ISBN: 9781137304612

Why have the minutiae of how parents raise their children become routine sources of public debate and policy making? This book provides in-depth answers to these features drawing on a wide range of sources from sociology, history, anthropology and psychology, covering developments in both Europe and North America.

Author: Arland Thornton, Genre: Social Science, Total Page: 344, Publisher: University of Chicago Press, ISBN: 9780226126791

European and American scholars from the eighteenth through the mid-twentieth centuries thought that all societies passed through the same developmental stages, from primitive to advanced. Implicit in this developmental paradigm—one that has affected generations of thought on societal development—was the assumption that one could "read history sideways." That is, one could see what the earlier stages of a modern Western society looked like by examining contemporaneous so-called primitive societies in other parts of the world. In Reading History Sideways, leading family scholar Arland Thornton demonstrates how this approach, though long since discredited, has permeated Western ideas and values about the family. Further, its domination of social science for centuries caused the misinterpretation of Western trends in family structure, marriage, fertility, and parent-child relations. Revisiting the "developmental fallacy," Thornton here traces its central role in changes in the Western world, from marriage to gender roles to adolescent sexuality. Through public policies, aid programs, and colonialism, it continues to reshape families in non-Western societies as well.